Winnipeg in Focus is a database for archival descriptions and digital collections at the City of Winnipeg Archives.

Series s00176 - Local Improvement Files

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Local Improvement Files

General material designation

  • Multiple media

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Level of description

Series

Reference code

s00176

Edition area

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Class of material specific details area

Statement of scale (cartographic)

Statement of projection (cartographic)

Statement of coordinates (cartographic)

Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1927-1972 ; predominant 1950-1971 (Creation)
    Creator
    St. Vital (Man.)

Physical description area

Physical description

2.17 m of textual records
Technical drawings
Architectural drawings
2 photographs

Publisher's series area

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Archival description area

Name of creator

(1880-1971)

Administrative history

The Rural Municipality and City of St. Vital dates to 1880 when the RM of St. Boniface was incorporated. After the Town of St. Boniface was formed in 1883, the RM of St. Boniface continued to operate as its own government and in 1903 changed its name to St. Vital to avoid confusion. The name likely derives from one of the earliest schools in the area built by Bishop Taché and named after his coadjutor Bishop Vital Grandin. The municipality experienced a series of boundary changes beginning in 1891 when it was reduced to the east and extended in the west and south. Further alterations were made in 1912 when the community on the west side of the Red River separated to form the RM of Fort Garry, and then in 1914, when a large tract of land was annexed to the City of St. Boniface and land annexed from the RM of Ritchot. It was bounded on the west and east by the Red and Seine Rivers, Carriere Avenue on the north and Grande Pointe on the south. It included parts of the Parishes of St. Boniface, St. Vital, and St. Norbert. In 1960, St. Vital became part of the Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg. With the passing of An Act to provide a Charter for the City of St. Vital, it achieved city status on June 9, 1962.

Councils consisted of a Reeve or Mayor and, in most instances, six councillors. The municipality derived authority from provincial legislation and was subject to the provisions of The Municipal Act, The Metropolitan Winnipeg Act and The Greater Winnipeg Gas Distribution Act. It briefly lost its mandate to govern between 1925 and 1927 when the Winnipeg Suburban Municipal Board stepped in due to financial difficulties. Standing committees and delegations changed from year to year in response to municipal growth. Council members notably participated in the St. Vital Advisory Planning Commission, St. Vital Library Board, and St. Vital Parks Board. Departments within the municipality included Administration, Public Works, Police and Fire. In 1952, Police and Fire went from being one department into two. Shortly after St. Vital became a city in 1962, the position of Secretary-Treasurer was split into City Clerk and City Treasurer.

The City of St. Vital ceased to exist in 1972, when Chapter 105 of the Statutes of Manitoba came into force unifying twelve area municipalities and the Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg into one city government. Following amalgamation, the Community of St. Vital was created as part of the new municipal structure.

Custodial history

Scope and content

Forms part of Fonds 10. Series consists of general and project files documenting local improvements in the Rural Municipality and City of St. Vital (1927-1972). It records the request and approval for local improvements as well as their financing and administration. Common record types include correspondence, account sheets, petitions, drawings, tenders, specifications, bonds, and contracts.

Series arranged into groupings based on like subjects and/or file contents. General files on local improvements and types of local improvements (ie: oiling, paving, sewers, etc.) appear first, followed by petitions and requests. Case files arranged chronologically by street name appear last.

Notes area

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

Arrangement

Language of material

  • English

Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

There are no restrictions on access to these records.

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Researchers are responsible for observing Canadian copyright regulations.

Finding aids

A file list is available in the Archives Research Room.

Associated materials

Related materials

Accruals

No further accruals are expected.

Alternative identifier(s)

Legacy Identifier

F0010-0110

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COWA

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