Winnipeg in Focus is a database for archival descriptions and digital collections at the City of Winnipeg Archives.

Showing 110 results

people and organizations

Yanofsky, Abe

  • Person
  • 1925-2000

Born Daniel Abraham Yanofsky in Poland in 1925, Abe Yanofsky came to Canada as a small child. His family eventually settled in Winnipeg. Yanofsky was a graduate of the University of Manitoba and a Rhodes scholar, and earned a law degree at Oxford. He returned to Winnipeg where he became a successful lawyer and Queen’s Counsel. Yanofsky served as Alderman and Mayor of West Kildonan from 1961 until 1971, then as Councillor on the Unicity Council of the City of Winnipeg from 1972 until 1986. Among his accomplishments in civic politics was construction of the Seven Oaks General Hospital and Wellness Institute in Winnipeg’s north end.

In addition to his legal and political careers, Yanofsky was an exceptional chess player, winning the Canadian Chess Championship eight times. His development as a player began early. By the age of eleven he was recognized as a child prodigy, and represented Canada on second board in the world chess Olympiad in Argentina in 1939. He was named Grand Master in 1964 by the world chess organization, FIDE. Yanofsky was a central figure on the local chess scene, wrote the Free Press chess column for many years and was responsible for bringing the Pan American Chess Championships to Winnipeg in 1974.

Abe Yanofsky was awarded the Order of Canada in 1972. He died March 5, 2000.

Winnipeg into the Nineties (WIN)

  • Corporate body
  • 1989-1996

Winnipeg into the Nineties (WIN) was a volunteer group of citizens with a vision of how the City of Winnipeg should and could be developed. Created in January 1989, meetings were held bi-weekly at the Social Planning Council of Winnipeg offices and were chaired by Shirley Bradshaw. Members of the Founding Committee were: Shirley Bradshaw, Al Ducharme, Elizabeth Fleming, Mike Gidora, Barry Hammond, Marilyn Letts, Shirley Lord, Christine McKee, Evelyn Reese, Greg Selinger, Tom Simms and Donna Mae Yeo.

WIN was formed to oppose the so-called "Gang of 18", an informal group of councillors who held a majority on council and who met regularly before official council meetings to determine the city's agenda. The "Gang of 18" was a successor to the Independent Citizen's Election Committee, a right-wing municipal party that dominated Winnipeg's city council from the early 1970s to the early 1980s. WIN’s objectives were: to provide a vision for the City of Winnipeg and a future agenda based on clear policies for action; to promote open government and freedom of information in the interests of informed decision-making; to ensure accountability of elected officials on the basis of agreed, openly-stated policy positions; to promote ethical government and financial accountability through the open declaration of election contributions, individual statements of assets, and clear, conflict of interest by-laws; and to encourage citizen participation and consistent, reasoned decision-making that could be explained and justified to the general public. WIN worked to raise community awareness of municipal issues in Winnipeg, to facilitate the construction of a policy platform designed to achieve its stated objectives, and to field and support candidates who supported their objectives. WIN endorsed several candidates in Winnipeg’s 1989, 1992 and 1995 municipal elections, including future Mayor Glen Murray and future premier of Manitoba, Greg Selinger.

In the 1990’s WIN continued as a political organization in Winnipeg, under the name “Winnipeg in the '90s”. It was dissolved by members in late 1996.

Winnipeg Flood Record and Archives Committee

  • 1997-

The Flood Record and Archives Committee was created in May of 1997 by the Chief Commissioner, Board of Commissioners of the City of Winnipeg, and was dissolved in [1998]. Its mandate was to collect records of all Winnipeg, Manitoba floods from City departments and to add to existing archives. Collecting focussed on records created by the City of Winnipeg administration, records collected from outside organisations for elected officials, and records existing in the City of Winnipeg Archives. The Committee was chaired by the City Clerk, and included the City Records Manager and Archivist, the Emergency Program Co-ordinator, and a Flood of the Century journalist from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Emergency Preparedness and Co-ordination Committee was created in the early 1980’s, and managed the 1997 flood in Winnipeg. It co-ordinated the activities of all civic departments, outside agencies, the public sector, and volunteer groups during the State of Emergency. In April and May, sandbagging operations were undertaken along rivers in the city and in the flooded regions to the south as the Red River crested at 24.5 feet above normal. Rural and urban areas were evacuated, and the Provencher Bridge in Saint-Boniface was closed. The EPCC’s permanent provincial affiliate is the Inter-agency Committee for Emergency Preparedness, co-ordinated by the Manitoba Emergency Measures Organisation. The EPCC is supervised by the city’s Emergency Control Committee (Mayor, Deputy Mayor, Chair of Works and Operations, Chair of Protection, Parks and Culture, and Board of Commissioners members) which is responsible for implementing the Emergency Preparedness Program. The EPCC is chaired by the Commissioner of Protection, Parks and Culture and operates out of the Emergency Operations Centre in the City Hall Council building basement.

Winnipeg (Man.). Winnipeg War Memorial Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1927-1929

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

In 1920, the Women's Canadian Club of Winnipeg erected a temporary monument in front of the Bank of Montreal building at Portage and Main. When the temporary monument was taken down in November of 1923 to make way for the Bank's own war memorial, the question of securing a site and constructing a monument for the City to honor its war dead was again raised by citizens. Given that the City had an interest in the outcome of this initiative, Council appointed representatives to the Winnipeg War Memorial Committee by motion on February 21, 1927. The Winnipeg War Memorial Committee had representation from groups like the Canukeena Club, the Imperial Veterans, the Army and Navy Veterans, the War Widows Association, the Women's Canadian Club, the Rotary Club, the Trades and Labour Council, the Canadian Legion, the I.O.D.E., and Winnipeg City Council. The committee concluded its work in June of 1929 when it requested that the memorial it had unveiled in November of 1928 be transferred to the Parks Board for perpetual care and maintenance.

Winnipeg (Man.). Winnipeg Traffic Commission

  • Corporate body
  • 1954-1971

The Winnipeg Traffic Commission (WTC) was founded in 1954, with the passing of By-Law No. 17252. In 1970, By-Law No. 17252 was replaced with By-Law No. 19782, which contained all amendments made from 1954 to 1970.

The WTC consisted of the City Signals Engineer, City Traffic Engineer, Chief of Police or his representative, a representative of the City Engineer's Department, at least three members of Council, and two or three citizen representatives. The Mayor was made an ex officio member in 1959, and the Fire Chief became a regular member in 1967.

The WTC was authorized to investigate and consider all matters related to the control and regulation of traffic, and make recommendations to Council; make and enforce temporary regulations to meet emergencies and special conditions; direct and co-ordinate all operations of the City related to the regulation and control of traffic; receive recommendations related to traffic; test traffic control devices under actual conditions; and prepare and publish reports on traffic matters and carry out educational activities.

Winnipeg (Man.). Volunteer Aid and Relief Fund Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1885

The Volunteer Aid and Relief Fund Committee was established by Council Motion on April 13, 1885. The Motion provided an initial sum of $1000 to be used exclusively for the relief of the "wives and families of those volunteers" called to the front, and established a committee to administer the fund. The Committee consisted of the mayor and six aldermen. The Committee was assisted by a Ladies Association, the members of which found "cases of necessity among the families of the Volunteers". The work of the Committee concluded in October of 1885. An audit of their papers and books was approved by Council and forwarded to the newspaper for publication.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Publicity Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1919-1920

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Publicity Committee was appointed by Council in April of 1919 to consider and report on the advisability and associated cost of organizing an advertising campaign to be directed at manufacturing firms and industries that might consider locating in the City of Winnipeg. The committee consisted of three aldermen, the City Solicitor and the manager of the Light and Power Department. Members considered submissions from a number of individuals and firms regarding the proposed campaign, ultimately placing advertisements in various publications. The Special Publicity Committee adjourned in 1920.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Food Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1919

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Food Committee was organized at an informal meeting of Council held on June 4, 1919. Having been advised that members of various locals in the city had received orders from the Strike Committee to quit work at 11:00 am on June 4, the Committee was set up to make arrangements to distribute bread and milk. Members of the Health Department managed the purchase, delivery and sale of milk, which was distributed at Winnipeg public schools from June 5 to June 21, 1919. There are no associated minutes for this special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee to Investigate Inspection Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1922

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee to Investigate Inspection Services was appointed by Council in March of 1922 to consider and report on the amalgamation or coordination of inspection services. In particular, the committee was instructed to identify overlapping or duplicate effort and ways to increase efficiency and economy. The committee consisted of seven aldermen. While committee records do not contain a final report or recommendations, the task of reorganizing city departments is revisited between 1923 and 1926 by another special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee to Investigate Charges regarding Purchase of Motor Trucks

  • Corporate body
  • 1920

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee to Investigate Charges regarding Purchase of Motor Trucks was appointed on February 2, 1920 to address allegations made by the Winnipeg Motor Trades Association, Car Section, that tenders to supply vehicles to the City did not receive impartial consideration. The file contains a Resolution by the Winnipeg Motor Trades Association, Car Section, which includes the names of vehicle dealerships and managers. Also included is a statement by J. G. Sullivan, Consulting Engineer, refuting the charge. Sullivan's statement is signed by members of the committee responsible for selecting vehicles for purchase.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee to Enquire into the Employment of Married Women

  • Corporate body
  • 1924-1924

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter “A”.

The Special Committee to Enquire into the Employment of Married Women was appointed by Council on July 14, 1924 to determine how many married women were employed by the City. The Committee was also required to gather information regarding residency for all City employees. Based on a detailed survey of City departments, the Special Committee recommended to Council and Council adopted a policy of not engaging married women if they were not dependent on their work to manage their affairs and of not engaging any help resident outside the City. The Special Committee was composed of four aldermen. No file code was assigned to this special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on the Future of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-1964

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on the Future of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation was established by Council motion in May of 1962. It was composed of the mayor and two aldermen each from the Committees of Finance, Utilities, Personnel and Public Works and was instructed to determine whether or not to submit a referendum to ratepayers concerning dissolution of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation, and what to do should ratepayers vote to retain the Board. Although the committee advised against a referendum and prepared a draft agreement identifying services the City would perform for the Board, a referendum held in October of 1964 (By-Law 19003)) resulted in dissolution of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation. The file code for this special committee was A107.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Street Railway Transportation Matters

  • Corporate body
  • 1930-1950

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on Street Railway Transportation Matters (originally the Special Committee on Transportation Question) was established by Council motion in October of 1930 for the purpose of "investigating the whole question of the providing of transportation within the limits of the City of Winnipeg". A key issue was the proposed purchase of the Winnipeg Electric Company by the City, and so the series contains considerable information about the Winnipeg Electric Company and the role it played in passenger transportation. Public transportation in Winnipeg dates from 1882, when horse cars were first used. The first electric car began operating in 1892 and horse cars were discontinued in 1894. Gasoline buses were first used in 1918 and trolley buses in 1938. The Winnipeg Electric Street Railway was formed in 1892. By 1900, this company had purchased the horse car company, the Manitoba Electric and Gas Light Company and the Northwest Electric Company. By 1946, the company was operating 30 trolley buses, 215 passenger street cars and 184 motor buses in the greater Winnipeg area and employed 2,432 people, see the Annual Report, 1946 in A9 (17). See also file A9 (16) for a Transit Map of Greater Winnipeg for the winter of 1943-1944.

After protracted negotiations, the proposed purchase was abandoned and the Committee turned instead towards discussion of a new franchise agreement between the City and the Winnipeg Electric Company. A further round of negotiations regarding purchase of the company by the City began in the spring of 1945. The name of the Committee was changed by Council motion on March 6, 1939 to Special Committee on Transportation Franchise and again in June of 1944 to Special Committee on Street Railway Transportation Matters. The file code for this special committee was A9.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Social Evil Question

  • Corporate body
  • 1910

The Special Committee on Social Evil Question was appointed by Council on February 28, 1910 to meet with a similarly named committee of the Moral and Social Reform Council of Manitoba to address prostitution in the area around Rachel and McFarlane Streets in particular. Later in 1910, Council requested the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council appoint a Commission to investigate charges of graft within the police department regarding trade in liquor and prostitution within a segregated area in the City (Rachel and McFarlane Streets). Judge Robson's report was received by the City in January of 1911. Although Council adopted a motion to have the Special Committee on Social Evil Question "remain a permanent Committee of the City Council for the year 1910", a handwritten note dated January 3, 1912 states "This matter has not been taken up." Committee minutes exist for three meetings in 1910 (March 17, 21 and 22). No file code was assigned to this special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Post-War Reconstruction

  • Corporate body
  • 1942-1948

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on Post-War Reconstruction was established by Council motion on February 16, 1942. It was composed of two aldermen from each of the three wards of the City and was instructed to identify likely projects for post-war work within Winnipeg, draft a plan of action and consult broadly with other public bodies engaged in similar work. The identification and development of municipal projects was linked to a broader national objective of securing employment and stability for those demobilized from the armed forces and from war industries. Among the projects identified were: improvements to Winnipeg General Hospital; improvements to city schools; repairs and renewal of sewer and water systems, bridges, pavement and riverbanks; as well as mention of a new city hall. The committee consulted with other Canadian cities engaged in similar planning and solicited advice and information from the local business community. The file code for this special committee was A49.

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