Winnipeg in Focus is a database for archival descriptions and digital collections at the City of Winnipeg Archives.

Showing 110 results

people and organizations

Winnipeg (Man.). Parking Authority

  • Corporate body
  • 1959-1972

The Parking Authority was founded in 1958, with the passing of By-Law No. 18056. In 1972, the Parking Authority was put under the control of the Committee on Environment, and in 1973, By-Law No. 18056 was repealed.

The Parking Authority was responsible for the construction, operation, maintenance, control and management of public parking lots and parking buildings belonging to the City. Most business consisted of expropriating land to build parking lots.

Winnipeg (Man.). Parks and Recreation Department

  • Corporate body

Development of Winnipeg’s network of public parks began when the Public Parks Board was created by the City of Winnipeg in 1893 and empowered to acquire land for park purposes. In addition to park development, the Parks Board constructed and operated municipal golf courses and swimming pools, was involved in city beautification through tree planting and boulevard maintenance, and managed recreational facilities, the zoo and municipal cemeteries. The Parks Board evolved into the Parks and Recreation Department of the City of Winnipeg following a re-organization of municipal government in the greater Winnipeg area in the 1970s.

Winnipeg (Man.). Playgrounds Commission

  • Corporate body
  • 1908-1919

The first public playground in Winnipeg was opened in 1908 by the Committee on Public Playgrounds for Winnipeg, the members of which had been appointed at a citizens meeting on May 28, 1908: Mrs. J. Dick, Mrs. Dr. Sparling, J. Dyson, J. S. Woodsworth, J. W. McMillan, John Appleton, H. R. Hadcock, E. L. Drewry and H. E. Wilson. This committee solicited private funds for a demonstration project to be operated in conjunction with the Mother's Association through the summer of that year. By the fall of 1908, the Committee on Public Playgrounds for Winnipeg had become the Playgrounds Association of the City of Winnipeg, reflecting a broad trend in North America and their connection with the American Playgrounds Association. In 1909, the Association met with the City of Winnipeg's Board of Control to propose creation of a commission to manage a system of playgrounds for the city. The Board of Control supported the proposal and the Playgrounds Commission was organized in 1909 under By-Law 5557 with an appropriation of $4000. The Playgrounds Commission managed playgrounds until 1919 when its powers were transferred to the Public Parks Board through By-Law 9835.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Amalgamation

  • Corporate body
  • 1918

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee on Amalgamation was appointed by Council on August 19, 1918 to "consider and report on the question of adjusting, re-arranging and amalgamating the various departments of City Offices". In order to complete this task, the Committee requested statements from the City's twenty-three administrative departments showing the functions and duties of the department and the organization of staff (including the name, position, salary and responsibilities of each staff member). Statements were not requested for the Fire Department or the Light and Power Department. The Committee's final report was accepted by Council in December of 1918 and referred to the City Solicitor to draft requisite legislation. The Special Committee on Amalgamation had five members and adjourned following submission of its report to Council: Controllers Wallace and Puttee and Aldermen Fowler, Fisher and Vopni.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Arrangement of Committees for Incoming Council

  • Corporate body
  • 1920-[1922?]

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee on Arrangement of Committees for Incoming Council was appointed in January of 1920 to consider the arrangement of committees for the incoming council together with any rearrangement of departments that might be necessary. The committee consisted of six aldermen.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Consolidation of By-Laws Defining Duties of Council and Committees and Officers of the City

  • Corporate body
  • 1921

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee on Consolidating of By-Laws Defining Duties of Council and Committees and Officers of the City was appointed by Council in January of 1921. The committee consisted of the chairmen of standing committees to which department heads reported regarding the work of the city.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Housing Conditions

  • Corporate body
  • 1935-1957

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on Housing Conditions was formed in December of 1933. In the original motion, the committee was instructed to conduct a detailed survey of housing conditions in Winnipeg. This motion was amended and the scope of the committee expanded to address the "whole matter of housing conditions in the City of Winnipeg". In 1935, the committee was further instructed to look into overcrowding and to determine areas that could be cleared and redeveloped. Between 1937 and 1945, the committee formed and managed the Winnipeg Housing Company Limited and its demonstration home project.

Throughout its history, the committee worked with the federal and provincial governments to take advantage of programs and funding sources for housing starts and renovations. In particular, the committee worked with Wartime Housing Limited to address housing needs for returning servicemen and veterans. In 1947, the committee created a Fact Finding Board to prepare a report on housing conditions up to that point in time.

Acute housing shortages during the 1940s lead to creation of the Emergency Housing Department in 1945, reported to Council through the Special Committee on Housing Conditions. This city department maintained a registry of applicants for housing and available housing units, lead a campaign to encourage citizens to register and rent out unoccupied rooms in their homes, administered various emergency and low rental housing sites, and became increasingly involved in welfare and social work relating to tenants in city housing projects (individual or family case histories are contained in some communications files). Annual reports prepared by the Emergency Housing Department provide statistical data and analyses of the effects of acute housing shortages on those living in substandard housing as well as on the city as a whole.

Effective January 1, 1957, the staff of the Emergency Housing Department were transferred into the Public Welfare Department of the City of Winnipeg, which then reported to Council through the Public Welfare Committee. At the first council meeting in 1957, a motion to "not reappoint" the Special Committee on Housing Conditions carried by majority and it was discontinued.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Housing Conditions. Fact Finding Board on Housing Conditions

  • Corporate body
  • 1947

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. The Special Committee on Housing Conditions was formed in 1933. The Fact Finding Board on Housing Conditions was appointed in April of 1947 and completed their work in June of 1947.

The Fact Finding Board on Housing Conditions was established by Council in April of 1947. The motion read: "Be it resolved that a fact finding board in respect of housing in general in Winnipeg be appointed by the mayor and that the board report to council by July 1." The Board was made up of three aldermen and the mayor, and one member each from the following organizations: Winnipeg House Builders Association, Greater Winnipeg Lumber Dealers Association, Winnipeg Builders Exchange, Building Trades Council of Winnipeg, Winnipeg and District Trades and Labour Council, Canadian Legion, B.E.S.L. and Winnipeg Unit, Army and Navy Veterans in Canada. The Board solicited information from various jurisdictions, as well as briefs from individuals or groups with an interest in solving the City's housing crisis. The final Report of the City of Winnipeg, Fact Finding Board on Housing in Winnipeg was completed June 27, 1947 and the Board was dissolved.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Housing Conditions, Winnipeg Housing Company Limited

  • Corporate body
  • 1933-1945

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City.

The Special Committee on Housing Conditions was formed in 1933 and was responsible for the creation of the Winnipeg Housing Company Limited.

On June 28, 1937, Council accepted a report by the Special Committee on Housing Conditions and instructed the City Solicitor to draft incorporation papers for a company to be known as the Winnipeg Housing Company Limited. The company charter was granted by the Province of Manitoba and issued on July 17, 1937. Formation of the Company had been proposed by the Special Committee to address a severe housing shortage and to provide employment to construction workers and tradesmen during a period of severe unemployment. As well, the Company would enable the City to take advantage of provisions in the Dominion Housing Act for the construction of low cost housing. The success of this endeavor depended upon an amendment to the City's charter to allow the City to exchange residential building lots for common stock in the Company. While this amendment was before the Provincial Legislature, the Company constructed a demonstration home at 804 Ashburn Street; some 20,000 people toured this home in the fall of 1937 and the Company received expressions of interest in building similar homes from a significant number of these visitors. Early in 1938, the bill to amend the City of Winnipeg Charter was defeated in the Provincial Legislature and no further homes were built. In 1938, the Company reorganized to enable construction of low cost rental housing under part two of the National Housing Act of 1937. The Company filed returns at both the provincial and federal level until 1945.

The first (provisional) directors of the Company were: Mayor Frederick Warriner and Aldermen E. D. Honeyman, R. A. Sara, J. Blumberg and J. Simpkin. Alderman Sara, who served as Secretary-Treasurer and Secretary of the Company, was also Chairman of the City's Special Committee on Housing Conditions for the years 1937-1941. In September of 1937, Frank E. Halls of the construction company Carter, Halls, Aldinger Co. was elected a Director and then President of the Company.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Investigation of the Fire Department

  • Corporate body
  • 1919-1920

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter “A”.

The Special Committee on Investigation of the Fire Department was appointed by Council on May 13, 1919. It was composed of three aldermen, a representative of the Western Canada Fire Underwriters’ Association, one citizen member and one member of the Firemen’s Union. The Special Committee was instructed to review departmental operations with a view to recommending changes that would improve efficiency. The final report of the Special Committee was submitted to Council on May 25, 1920. While the Special Committee file does not contain a copy of the final report, the report was referred from Council to the Committee on Fire, Water, Light and Power and from there to the Committee on Public Safety (two copies of the report are located in File 12 of this committee’s communications). No file code was assigned to this special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Organization and Administration of Civic Departments

  • Corporate body
  • 1923-1926

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee on Organization and Administration of Civic Departments was appointed by Council in August of 1923 to consider and report on ways and means to improve the organization and administration of civic departments. The committee consisted of seven aldermen and the mayor. Reports to Council were submitted periodically and amendments to several by-laws to facilitate the movement of various functions from one department or branch to another were drafted and passed.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Post-War Reconstruction

  • Corporate body
  • 1942-1948

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on Post-War Reconstruction was established by Council motion on February 16, 1942. It was composed of two aldermen from each of the three wards of the City and was instructed to identify likely projects for post-war work within Winnipeg, draft a plan of action and consult broadly with other public bodies engaged in similar work. The identification and development of municipal projects was linked to a broader national objective of securing employment and stability for those demobilized from the armed forces and from war industries. Among the projects identified were: improvements to Winnipeg General Hospital; improvements to city schools; repairs and renewal of sewer and water systems, bridges, pavement and riverbanks; as well as mention of a new city hall. The committee consulted with other Canadian cities engaged in similar planning and solicited advice and information from the local business community. The file code for this special committee was A49.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Social Evil Question

  • Corporate body
  • 1910

The Special Committee on Social Evil Question was appointed by Council on February 28, 1910 to meet with a similarly named committee of the Moral and Social Reform Council of Manitoba to address prostitution in the area around Rachel and McFarlane Streets in particular. Later in 1910, Council requested the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council appoint a Commission to investigate charges of graft within the police department regarding trade in liquor and prostitution within a segregated area in the City (Rachel and McFarlane Streets). Judge Robson's report was received by the City in January of 1911. Although Council adopted a motion to have the Special Committee on Social Evil Question "remain a permanent Committee of the City Council for the year 1910", a handwritten note dated January 3, 1912 states "This matter has not been taken up." Committee minutes exist for three meetings in 1910 (March 17, 21 and 22). No file code was assigned to this special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on Street Railway Transportation Matters

  • Corporate body
  • 1930-1950

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on Street Railway Transportation Matters (originally the Special Committee on Transportation Question) was established by Council motion in October of 1930 for the purpose of "investigating the whole question of the providing of transportation within the limits of the City of Winnipeg". A key issue was the proposed purchase of the Winnipeg Electric Company by the City, and so the series contains considerable information about the Winnipeg Electric Company and the role it played in passenger transportation. Public transportation in Winnipeg dates from 1882, when horse cars were first used. The first electric car began operating in 1892 and horse cars were discontinued in 1894. Gasoline buses were first used in 1918 and trolley buses in 1938. The Winnipeg Electric Street Railway was formed in 1892. By 1900, this company had purchased the horse car company, the Manitoba Electric and Gas Light Company and the Northwest Electric Company. By 1946, the company was operating 30 trolley buses, 215 passenger street cars and 184 motor buses in the greater Winnipeg area and employed 2,432 people, see the Annual Report, 1946 in A9 (17). See also file A9 (16) for a Transit Map of Greater Winnipeg for the winter of 1943-1944.

After protracted negotiations, the proposed purchase was abandoned and the Committee turned instead towards discussion of a new franchise agreement between the City and the Winnipeg Electric Company. A further round of negotiations regarding purchase of the company by the City began in the spring of 1945. The name of the Committee was changed by Council motion on March 6, 1939 to Special Committee on Transportation Franchise and again in June of 1944 to Special Committee on Street Railway Transportation Matters. The file code for this special committee was A9.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee on the Future of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation

  • Corporate body
  • 1962-1964

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter "A".

The Special Committee on the Future of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation was established by Council motion in May of 1962. It was composed of the mayor and two aldermen each from the Committees of Finance, Utilities, Personnel and Public Works and was instructed to determine whether or not to submit a referendum to ratepayers concerning dissolution of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation, and what to do should ratepayers vote to retain the Board. Although the committee advised against a referendum and prepared a draft agreement identifying services the City would perform for the Board, a referendum held in October of 1964 (By-Law 19003)) resulted in dissolution of the Winnipeg Board of Parks and Recreation. The file code for this special committee was A107.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee to Enquire into the Employment of Married Women

  • Corporate body
  • 1924-1924

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities. From about 1924 onward, special committees and their associated files were assigned an alpha-numeric code beginning with the letter “A”.

The Special Committee to Enquire into the Employment of Married Women was appointed by Council on July 14, 1924 to determine how many married women were employed by the City. The Committee was also required to gather information regarding residency for all City employees. Based on a detailed survey of City departments, the Special Committee recommended to Council and Council adopted a policy of not engaging married women if they were not dependent on their work to manage their affairs and of not engaging any help resident outside the City. The Special Committee was composed of four aldermen. No file code was assigned to this special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee to Investigate Charges regarding Purchase of Motor Trucks

  • Corporate body
  • 1920

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government: while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee to Investigate Charges regarding Purchase of Motor Trucks was appointed on February 2, 1920 to address allegations made by the Winnipeg Motor Trades Association, Car Section, that tenders to supply vehicles to the City did not receive impartial consideration. The file contains a Resolution by the Winnipeg Motor Trades Association, Car Section, which includes the names of vehicle dealerships and managers. Also included is a statement by J. G. Sullivan, Consulting Engineer, refuting the charge. Sullivan's statement is signed by members of the committee responsible for selecting vehicles for purchase.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Committee to Investigate Inspection Services

  • Corporate body
  • 1922

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Committee to Investigate Inspection Services was appointed by Council in March of 1922 to consider and report on the amalgamation or coordination of inspection services. In particular, the committee was instructed to identify overlapping or duplicate effort and ways to increase efficiency and economy. The committee consisted of seven aldermen. While committee records do not contain a final report or recommendations, the task of reorganizing city departments is revisited between 1923 and 1926 by another special committee.

Winnipeg (Man.). Special Food Committee

  • Corporate body
  • 1919

The City of Winnipeg was incorporated in 1873 by a charter granted by the legislature of Manitoba. At incorporation, the City established a committee system of government – while Council was the governing body for the City, it was in committee that civic policies were formed and executed. The initial task for the first and all subsequent Councils was to strike standing committees for the Council year. In addition to standing committees, Council established special committees to investigate and manage various projects, issues and questions placed before the City. Special committees were typically struck by a Council motion that outlined committee composition and responsibilities.

The Special Food Committee was organized at an informal meeting of Council held on June 4, 1919. Having been advised that members of various locals in the city had received orders from the Strike Committee to quit work at 11:00 am on June 4, the Committee was set up to make arrangements to distribute bread and milk. Members of the Health Department managed the purchase, delivery and sale of milk, which was distributed at Winnipeg public schools from June 5 to June 21, 1919. There are no associated minutes for this special committee.

Results 81 to 100 of 110